Wednesday, November 28, 2012

I see in thy gentle eyes a tear

I went today to Hämeenlinna, a city one hour drive north from here. I did take some photographs, but didn't have much interest in it. However, late in the evening I started to read Michael Freeman's book The Photographer’s Vision, translated into Finnish, and it was good, maybe great. I have read his two earlier books in the "trilogy", and even though the earlier ones were competent, this one inspires.

When looking at the few photographs taken today, I noticed an interesting pair of pairs of photographs, their difference in framing. Do you think the stories differ?

Oh, and yes, we did get snow during the night. I'm pondering whether to commute by bicycle tomorrow. A little bit of snow is promised, but it shouldn't cause too much trouble.

(Posting title is from the poem The Snow-Shower by William Cullen Bryant.)

6 comments:

Markus Spring said...

Juha, "The Photographer's Eye" I think is a wonderful book, explaining so many essentials without falling into a scholarly tone. So if "Vision" is similar, I certainly will have a look at it.

And yes, your images tell different stories, and for that each has its own value.

Juha Haataja said...

Markus, Vision is more about vision and less about the craft, but yet it isn't scholarly but rather practical, and has lots of interesting anecdotes besides.

One thing which I did after reading to book was to order a copy of "John Szarkowski: Photographs". It was relatively cheap, so no big risk. I wanted to see what Szarkowski accomplished himself a photographer, and how it relates to his work at MOMA.

Cedric Canard said...

I'm a fan of Michael Freeman's photography though I've not read any of his books. I think I might look for his books in my local library.

As for your photographs. The close crop in each case creates a slightly more abstract feel to the image but for me that only works for the second pair. In fact, it works really well for that one. The wider view makes the car too distracting and makes the image feel messy. With the first pair I prefer the wider view. Mostly because the water on the glass is such an important part of the composition.

Juha Haataja said...

Cedric, Freeman's books are worth reading, though they are not quite the typical how-to guidebook, going deeper into what makes a photograph work, without too much dogmatism.

And thanks for the your views about the pairs of photographs. Recently I haven't had much time to think about photographs, or to take them, but now that we have snow it may be easier to get inspired. It isn't so dark either...

Andreas Manessinger said...

Without caring for the discussion: #3, no doubt :D

Juha Haataja said...

Andreas, good to have a firm opinion!